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10 Most Famous and Beautiful Mosques in Pakistan

10 Most Famous and Beautiful Mosques in Pakistan
Mosques are the beauty of Islamic architecture. Mostly Islamic Rulers built very astonishing and beautiful Mosques, below are the best examples from Pakistan.

A mosque is a place of worship for followers of Islam. Many mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls, in varying styles of architecture. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but are now found in all inhabited continents. The mosque serves as a place where Muslims can come together for salat  as well as a center for information, education, social welfare, and dispute settlement.

Mosques are often built very beautiful and astonishing because they represent Islamic culture. Where ever you go you will find a Mosque around you. Many Mosques are such beautiful that tourists from far off come to visit. Here in this list I am reporting 10 most famous and beautiful mosques in Pakistan.

Faisal Mosque, Islamabad

Faisal Mosque, Islamabad
Faisal Mosque, Islamabad

Faisal Mosque is the mosque in Islamabad, Pakistan. Located on the foothills of Margalla Hills in Islamabad, the mosque features a contemporary design consisting of eight sides of concrete shell and is inspired by a Bedouin tent. The mosque is a major tourist attraction, and is referred as a contemporary and influential feature of Islamic architecture.

Construction of the mosque began in 1976 after a $120 million grant from Saudi King Faisal, whose name the mosque bears. The unconventional design by Turkish architect Vedat Dalokay was selected after an international competition. Without a typical dome, the mosque is shaped like a Bedouin tent, surrounded by four 260 feet (79 m) tall minarets. The design features eight-sided shell shaped sloping roofs forming a triangular worship hall which can hold 10,000 worshippers, while the surrounding porticoes and the courtyard up-to 200,000 more.

Combined the structure cover an area of 54,000 square ft, the mosque dominates the landscape of Islamabad. It is situated at the north end of Faisal Avenue, putting it at the northern most end of the city and at the foot of Margalla Hills, the western most foothills of the Himalayas. It is located on an elevated area of land against a picturesque backdrop of the national park. The largest mosque in Pakistan, the Faisal Mosque was the largest mosque in the world from 1986 until 1993, when it was overtaken by mosques in MENA region. Faisal Mosque is now the fourth largest mosque in terms of capacity.

Grand Jamia Mosque, Lahore

Grand Jamia Mosque, Lahore
Grand Jamia Mosque, Lahore

Grand Jamia Mosque Lahore is a mosque located in Bahria Town, Lahore. With a capacity of 70,000 worshippers, it is the third largest mosque in Pakistan and the seventh largest mosque in the world.

Designed by Nayyar Ali Dada, it was inaugurated on Eid al-Adha on 6 October 2014. It can accommodate 25,000 worshipers indoors, while the courtyard and corridor leading to the main halls of worship can accommodate a total of 70,000. The architecture is influenced by Badshahi Masjid, Wazir Khan Mosque and Sheikh Zayed Mosque, with construction costs of over 4 billion rupees (or approximately $39 million).

The structure comprises four minarets, each 165 ft tall, and a grand dome, which is surrounded by 20 smaller domes. The exterior is surfaced with 4 million handmade Multani tiles. The interior is decorated with custom-made carpets imported from Turkey and over 50 chandeliers imported from Iran. One of the floors consists of an Islamic heritage museum displaying rare Quranic collections, an Islamic library and also an Islamic art gallery with various antique artifacts. Over four million Multani handcrafted mosaic tiles cover the surface area of the mosque.

Badshahi Mosque, Lahore

Badshahi Mosque, Lahore
Badshahi Mosque, Lahore

The Badshahi Mosque is a Mughal era mosque in Lahore, capital of the Pakistani province of Punjab. The mosque is located west of Lahore Fort along the outskirts of the Walled City of Lahore. The mosque is widely considered to be one of Lahore’s most iconic landmarks.

Badshahi Mosque was commissioned by Emperor Aurangzeb in 1671, with construction of the mosque lasting for two years until 1673. The mosque is an important example of Mughal architecture, with an exterior that is decorated with carved red sandstone with marble inlay. Upon completion, it became world’s largest mosque and remained so for 313 years until the expansion of Prophet’s Mosque. It remains the largest and most recent of the grand imperial mosques of the Mughal-era, and is the second-largest mosque in Pakistan. After the fall of the Mughal Empire, the mosque was used as a garrison by the Sikh Empire and the British Empire, but is now one of Pakistan’s most iconic sights.

Masjid-e-Tooba, Karachi

Masjid e Toba, Karachi
Masjid e Toba, Karachi

Masjid e Tooba or Tooba Mosque is in Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan, and is locally known as the Gol Masjid.

Masjid e Tooba was built in 1969 in Defence Housing Society Karachi, Karachi. It is just off main Korangi Road. Masjid e Tooba is often claimed to be the largest single-dome mosque in the world. It is also major tourist attraction in Karachi. Masjid e Tooba is built with pure white marble. The dome is 72 meters (236 feet) in diameter and is balanced on a low surrounding wall with no central pillars. Masjid e Tooba has a single minaret standing 70 meters high. The mosque is the 18th largest in the world with the central prayer hall having a capacity of 5,000 people.

It was built keeping acoustics in mind. A person speaking inside one end of the dome can be heard at the other end. This mosque was designed by Pakistani architect Dr Babar Hamid Chauhan and the engineer was Zaheer Haider Naqvi.

Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore

Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore
Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore

The Wazir Khan Mosque is a Mughal era mosque in the city of Lahore, capital of the Pakistani province of Punjab. The mosque was commissioned during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan as part of an ensemble of buildings that also included the nearby Shahi Hammam baths. Construction of Wazir Khan Mosque began in 1634 C.E., and was completed in 1641.

Considered to be the most ornately decorated Mughal-era mosque, Wazir Khan Mosque is renowned for its intricate faience tile work known as kashi-kari, as well as its interior surfaces that are almost entirely embellished with elaborate Mughal-era frescoes. The mosque has been under extensive restoration since 2009 under the direction of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture and the Government of Punjab, with contributions from the governments of Germany, Norway, and the United States.

Shah Jahan Mosque, Thatta

Shah Jahan Mosque, Thatta
Shah Jahan Mosque, Thatta

The Shah Jahan Mosque is located in Thatta, Sindh province, Pakistan. It was built during the reign of Mughal emperor Shah Jahan. He made it as a gift for the kind and warm hospitality of the people of Thatta. It is unique in this way that it contains no minarets but has a total of a staggering, 93 domes, the highest for any structure in Pakistan. Unlike other Mughal-era structures, it also does not contain pink sandstone.

Interior of Shah Jahan Mosque
Interior of Shah Jahan Mosque

It was made using materials from areas of Sindh such as Hala (where the bricks were imported from). The mosque is famous for its beautiful tile-work.

Mohabbat Khan Mosque, Peshawar

Mohabbat Khan Mosque, Peshawar
Mohabbat Khan Mosque, Peshawar

The Mohabbat Khan Mosque is a 17th-century mosque in Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. It is named after the Mughal governor of Peshawar Nawab Mahabat Khan bin Ali Mardan Khan, known as Mahabat Khan and Ali Mardan Khan, who served under Emperors Shah Jehan and Aurangzeb and who was the grandson of Nawab Dadan Khan (a former governor of Lahore). The name of the Masjid and the governor who built is often mispronounced as ‘Muhabbat Khan’ (‘Love Khan’) by the public majority instead of the correct pronunciation ‘Mahabat Khan’ (‘Awe-inspiring Khan’).

The Mosque was built in 1630. Its open courtyard has a centrally-located ablution pool and a single row of rooms lining the exterior walls. The prayer hall, flanked by two tall minarets, occupies the west side. According to the turn-of-the-century Gazetteer for Pakhtunkhwa.

The minarets of the Mohabbat Khan Mosque were frequently used in Sikh times (especially that of Ranjit Singh) as a substitute for the gallows’.

The interior of the prayer hall is sheltered beneath three low, fluted domes and is eloquently painted with floral and geometric designs.

Bhong Mosque, Raheem-yar-Khan

Bhong Mosque, Raheem-yar-Khan
Bhong Mosque, Raheem-yar-Khan

Bhong Mosque is located in the village of Bhong, Sadiqabad Tehsil, Rahim Yar Khan District, Southern Punjab. It was designed and constructed over a period of nearly 50 years (1932–1982) and won the Aga Khan Award for Architecture in 1986. The construction of the Masjid (Mosque) was under control of Master Abdul Hameed (kamboh) who worked relentlessly hard for the mosque to make sure it was exquisite and a landmark for Pakistan. A postage stamp depicting it was issued on May 12, 2004 in Pakistan.

Moti Masjid, Lahore

Moti Masjid, Lahore
Moti Masjid, Lahore

Moti Masjid, one of the “Pearl Mosques”, is a 17th-century religious building located inside the Lahore Fort. It is a small, white marble structure built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan, and is among his prominent extensions (such as Sheesh Mahal and Naulakha pavilion) to the Lahore Fort Complex. The mosque is located on the western side of Lahore Fort, closer to Alamgiri Gate, the main entrance.

Outer View of Moti Masjid
Outer View of Moti Masjid
 After the demise of the Mughal Empire, the mosque was converted into a Sikh temple and renamed Moti Mandir during the period of the Sikh rule under Ranjit Singh’s Sikh Confederacy (1716—99). Later, Ranjit Singh also used the building for the state treasury. When the British took over Punjab in 1849, they discovered precious stones wrapped in bits of rags and placed in velvet purses scattered inside the mosque, along with other inventory. The building was later revived to its former status, and the religious relics were conserved at the nearby Badshahi Mosque.

Dai Anga Mosque, Lahore

Dai Anga Mosque, Lahore
Dai Anga Mosque, Lahore

Dai Anga Mosque is a mosque situated to southeast of the Lahore Railway Station, in the city of Lahore in Pakistan’s Punjab province. The mosque is said to have been built in 1635 in honour of the wetnurse of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, Dai Anga.

About the author

Muhammad Shafan

Shafan is a blogger, web designer and programmer. By day he is a freelancer as well. He loves to write and more than anything he loves to play football.

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