Pakistan Places

Top 5 Tourist Attraction in Pakistan that Will Make You say Woww!

Fairy Meadows, Nanga Parbat
Places that can astonish you in Pakistan. EYECATCHERS!!!

Whenever we think of visiting beautiful places, we immediately think of other countries. While international trips have a charm of their own, here are some places in Pakistan that everyone absolutely must visit before they die.

1) Lake Saif Ul Malook

Lake Saif Ul Malook
Lake Saif Ul Malook

Saiful Muluk is a mountainous lake located at the northern end of the Kaghan Valley, near the town of Naran. It is in the north east of Maansehra District in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhawa province, Pakistan and feeds water to Kunhaar river. At an elevation of 3,224 m (10,578 feet) above sea level, it is well above the tree line, and is one of the highest lakes in Pakistan.

2) Fairy Meadows, Nanga Parbat

Fairy Meadows, Nanga Parbat
Fairy Meadows, Nanga Parbat

Fairy Meadows, named by German climbers (German Märchenwiese, ″fairy tale meadows″) and locally known as Joot, is a grassland near one of the base camp sites of the Nanga Parbat, located in Diamer District, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. At an altitude of about 3,300 meters above the sea level, it serves as the launching point for trekkers summiting on the Rakhiot face of the Nanga Parbat. In the year 1995, the Government of Pakistan declared Fairy Meadows a National Park.

3) Badshahi Mosque, Lahore

Badshahi Mosque, Lahore
Badshahi Mosque, Lahore

The Badshahi Mosque is a Mughal era mosque in Lahore, capital of the Pakistani province of Punjab. The mosque is located west of Lahore Fort along the outskirts of the Walled City of Lahore. The mosque is widely considered to be one of Lahore’s most iconic landmarks.

Badshahi Mosque was commissioned by Emperor Aurangzeb in 1671, with construction of the mosque lasting for two years until 1673. The mosque is an important example of Mughal architecture, with an exterior that is decorated with carved red sandstone with marble inlay. Upon completion, it became world’s largest mosque and remained so for 313 years until the expansion of Prophet’s Mosque. It remains the largest and most recent of the grand imperial mosques of the Mughal-era, and is the second-largest mosque in Pakistan. After the fall of the Mughal Empire, the mosque was used as a garrison by the Sikh Empire and the British Empire, but is now one of Pakistan’s most iconic sights.

4) Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore

Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore
Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore

The Wazir Khan Mosque is a Mughal era mosque in the city of Lahore, Capital of the Pakistani province of Punjab. The mosque was commissioned during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan as part of an ensemble of buildings that also included the nearby Shahi Hammam baths. Construction of Wazir Khan Mosque began in 1634 C.E., and it was completed in 1641.

Considered to be the most ornately decorated Mughal era mosque, Wazir Khan Mosque is renowned for its intricate faience tile work known as kashi-kari, as well as its interior surfaces that are almost entirely embellished with elaborate Mughal-era frescoes. The mosque has been under extensive restoration since 2009 under the direction of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture and the Government of Punjab, with contributions from the governments of Germany, Norway, and the United States.

5) Ranikot Fort, District Jamshoro

Ranikot Fort, District Jamshoro
Ranikot Fort, District Jamshoro

Ranikot Fort is a historical fort near Sann, Jamshoro District, Sindh, Pakistan. Ranikot Fort is also known as The Great Wall of Sindh and is believed to be the world’s largest fort. With a circumference of approximately 26 kilometers (16 mi). The fort’s ramparts have been compared to the Great Wall of China.

The site was nominated in 1993 by the Pakistan National Commission for UNESCO world heritage status, and has since been on the tentative list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The fort is listed as a historical site under the Antiquities Act, 1975 and its subsequent amendments, and is provided protection.